ITALY: Florence

ITALY ACADEMICS

The semester and academic year curriculum offer courses, apprenticeships, and internships. Courses are taught at Accademia Italiana. Apprenticeships are organized by Schola Academy Firenze in cooperation with major brands and workshops in Florence. Internships are with Zerolab, a company that focuses on sustainability in the fashion industry.

KEI offers two academic tracks. The Academic Track allows students to enroll in up to 5 courses (15 credits) per semester. The Experiential Track consists of an apprenticeship (6 credits) combined with up to 3 courses (9 credits), or an internship (3 credits) combined with up to 4 courses (12 credits).

COURSES

Download and use the Course Offerings file to view and select courses offered during the Fall and Spring semesters. After selecting your courses, review course descriptions under each department (below). Click on course titles to download syllabi. If a title is not hyperlinked, email KEI to request syllabi for the course(s).

Fashion Design

ACCF FDFI 190: Fashion Illustration I
This course will introduce students to the basics of fashion illustration. It concentrates on the development of the student’s manual and artistic skills in the sketching of the stylized, clothed human figure adopted by fashion designers. Various technical and artistic techniques using different drawing materials (colored pencils, watercolors, Pantone markers) will be employed to represent body structure, fabric type and texture, fashion styles, and sensations.

ACCF FDFI 290: Fashion Illustration II
This course will introduce students to the use of different color techniques to illustrate fashion collections for men and women. Students will be taught how to represent different fabric types and textures as well as fashion accessories. Their fashion illustrations will become more realistic with the application of color techniques (water-colored pencils, watercolors, Pantone pens). Students will be shown how to apply various color techniques to represent fabrics (silk, transparent organza, knitwear, fur, etc.) and volume (lights-shadows).

ACCF FDFI 390: Fashion Illustration III
This course is designed to develop the student’s style and fashion illustration techniques progressively, using professional coloring techniques (Pantone markers) with other technical materials (colored pencils, pens, chalks, watercolors, collage, etc.) for the purpose of achieving a high level of graphic illustration for fashion design. The various color technique exercises will be executed using the designs developed for the fashion collection course. Color techniques for specific types of materials (fur, leather, transparent materials, etc.) will be explored.

ACCF FDFI 490: Fashion Illustration IV
This course is meant to accompany ACCF FDCT 490: Collection Theory IV, to produce the graphic illustrations used in the Collection Theory course.

ACCF FDCT 190: Collection I
This course is an introduction to the profession of the fashion designer, focusing on the basic practical techniques of Fashion Design applied to men’s and women’s wear. Particular attention will be given to technical or flat drawing, to the analysis of fashion garments, their construction, shapes, and proportions, and to the choice of fabrics for making the final collection.

ACCF FDCT 290: Collection II
This course aims to improve students’ professional training in the working methods of a contemporary fashion designer. Past semester knowledge and information will be integrated and improved upon with lessons and exercises that will include the actual creation of several fashion collections. In particular, the following topics will be covered: trends research, identification of the final customer, mood-board construction, fabric choice, drawings for the collection to be divided per outfits, presentation of the collection and introduction to knitwear design.

ACCF FDCT 390: Collection III
The course’s objective is to develop the student’s ability to further create personal fashion projects through various steps: exhaustive study and research of the collection’s inspiration and topics; identification, analysis, and development of fashion trends; research and coordination of fabrics and colors; sketches and technical drawings working outline; personal graphics lay-out of the final project presentation. In this course, the research process for individual inspiration will be more in-depth: the student will develop and focus on his/her personal style, through brain-storming and exhaustive research, so that the resulting fashion projects with containing original ideas and personal graphic presentation layouts.

ACCF FDCT 490: Collection IV
This course aims to improve students’ professional training in the working methods of a contemporary fashion designer so that they will create collections and projects that are not only professionally designed and coordinated but that will also reveal the students’ taste, creativity, and knowledge of current trends, research and sense of contemporaneity. Another important goal is that students develop some suitable material to be presented in their final graduation portfolio. Particular attention will be given to quality, both in terms of creativity and correct execution. Students’ works should show a strong interaction between design, practical tailoring experiments, and other “three-dimensional” works and a strong sensitivity to research, information, and graphics.

ACCF FDPD 190: Pattern Design I
The course teaches students to create pattern bases such as those for a skirt, pants, and bodice. Once a base has been created the student will learn to create variations. Students will also learn to take accurate body measurements before making a pattern and to interpret a sketch made by someone else.

ACCF FDPD 290: Pattern Design II
The course aims to instruct students in the creation of complex patterns (for dresses, kimonos, and jackets) fundamental to fashion design. Part of the course is devoted to high fashion men’s wear. Students will learn stylistic modifications and variations for sleeves and necklines. They will make prototypes in toile, the 3-dimensional model allowing them to evaluate the precision of their patterns in order to make corrections on their own. The designs created during the course will provide students with advanced skills in professional pattern making and in prototyping with toile.

ACCF FDHC 190: History of Costume I
The course aims to establish a cultural foundation to support and inspire students as they create fashion projects while developing their own personal styles. The course will explore the History of Costume as it developed in Europe, China, and Japan from the Dark Ages (800s) to 1800. Dress and adornment will be analyzed from a historical, social, economic, and technical point of view. Art works such as paintings, frescoes, sculptures, bas-reliefs, architecture, ceramics, furniture, interiors, home textiles, etc. will be studied to demonstrate how various design elements relate to the History of Costume and express the period style.

ACCF FDHC 290: History of Costume II
The course’s objective is to develop a cultural background supporting and inspiring the students in the creation of their fashion projects while improving their own personal styles. During this course, students will develop a background knowledge concerning the evolution of the modern History of Costume and Fashion in Europe and the United States from the end of 1800 to1980. Students will identify, analyze and contextualize the “vintage” references found in the contemporary fashion world.

ACCF FDCS 390: Clothing Samples I
This course aims to provide students with the necessary instruments to analyze in-depth the various phases of clothing sample production. Students will learn the industrial methods of garment construction. The garments will be entirely constructed according to industrial specifications in the sewing laboratory.

ACCF FDCS 490: Clothing Samples II
In this course, students will produce a mini-collection with a number of pre-established items, including a dress and a simple item such as a cloak. The garment for the second project will be chosen from the Collection course book. All steps of the work process will be included in the final exam. The same methods used in Clothing Samples I will be adopted to strengthen students’ technical knowledge and will be refined and expanded upon.

ACCF FDPT 290: Fashion Design Prototypes
The purpose of this course is to teach the student the importance of various stitching and sewing details in the construction of garments.

ACCF FDTT 390: Tailoring Techniques I
This course will teach the student the skills and techniques to design and create tailored garments. Students will experiment with different types and combinations of fabrics. In designing and creating tailored fashion garments, students will better understand the importance of high-quality tailoring techniques. Students will learn to construct garments that will be tailor-finished, such as hand-finished seams, hand-attached buttonholes, use of linings, and interfacings.

ACCF FDTT 490: Tailoring Techniques II
The objective of this module is to teach students advanced industrial methods of garment construction ranging from those that are commercially mass-produced to those that are industrially tailored. This knowledge serves to enhance the quality of the fashion collections that students will then be proposing, as they will also be taking into consideration the construction techniques to be employed in the production of their garments.

ACCF FDCP 390: Computer Aided Pattern Design
This course aims to equip students with the skills and knowledge needed to design the patterns of collections on the computer in a quick and professional manner. It is meant to accompany the laboratory pattern-making course. Students will create basic patterns of women’s clothing using specific industry software.

ACCF FDMK 471: Marketing and Trends
This class will provide students with the skills of analysis and conceptual tools for planning and implementing fashion marketing and communication plans. The main themes that will be examined are the role and importance of fashion marketing and communications in the industry; different fashion marketing strategies to launch, consolidate or discontinue a collection; design, planning, and implementation of a fashion marketing and communications plan; fashion marketing analysis; identification of fashion target markets; marketing concepts (marketing mix, product life cycle, brand positioning, break-even points, etc.). Traditional marketing concepts such as brand, logo, image, product concept, marketing mix, target group, price fixing, communications, events, crisis management, etc. will be examined.

ACCF FDAD 490: Accessories Design
The course is designed to teach the student the importance of fashion accessories and how to design and make various fashion accessories. The students will complete three projects during the course: Project 1: Design a small accessory (eg. a ring, pair of sunglasses, etc.; Project 2: Design a bag; Project 3: Design a shoe.

ACCF FDFP 490 Fashion Photography
This course analyzes the visual aspects of fashion communication, providing a critical history of fashion photography and illustration from its beginning to the trends of today, emphasizing iconography and the major masters of the camera, designers, and art directors. Students will explore current fashion practices and developments in publicity and advertising, including editing and different views of fashion, as they have evolved along with the modern woman. In preparing a personal advertising project, students will gain an awareness of current practices of visual communication in fashion.

ACCF FDCP 190: Computer Aided Fashion Design I
The course will instruct students in the graphic representation of colors and fabrics and how to apply them to figure drawings in the production of a collection. Students will learn to create background images and location sets in order to produce a fine professional portfolio for their fashion collections. Students will use Adobe Illustrator software in class. Students will mainly be evaluated on class participation. The final course evaluation will be based on the presentation of a portfolio of the student’s work that represents the various techniques of computer design learned in class.

ACCF FDCP 290: Computer Aided Fashion Design II
Students will learn to create and design a fashion collection on the computer in a fast, accurate, and professional manner, using Adobe Photoshop software to process photographs and digital images. They will use the program’s numerous coloring techniques to modify figures previously hand-drawn and scanned and will complete the figures with selected fabrics transformed into patterns to create a realistic look. By the end of the course, they will have created two small collections of fashion sketches with accompanying mood boards.

ACCF FDWD 190: Window Displays Design
This course is a basic but intensive introduction to the design of window displays. It provides crucial skills and knowledge to those who aspire to become visual merchandisers and retail designers. The program combines basic elements of visual merchandising with important basic tools of design. Part of the course will be developed in close relationships with partner stores. This emphasis on the real-life application of skills will help students to accelerate their professional skills.

Textile Design

ACCF TDTP 190: Textile Printing
The course is an introduction to various techniques and processes involved in silkscreen (serigraphy), as well as techniques in textile design and/or printmaking. The course will have two options: textile surface design/printing on fabric or art prints on paper. The course will include an introduction to the history of silkscreen and numerous early, simple stencil-making techniques, with an emphasis on photographic emulsion techniques, which are covered in depth. Stencil techniques will cover hand drawn, painted, or cut transparencies, the use of photocopies, computer printouts, photos from litho film, etc. On the computer, designs will be worked on with Photoshop for posterization, color separation, pixels, positive, negative, etc. Instruction will cover stencil-making, exercises in creating repeat patterns, darkroom procedures, color use, ink mixing, registration for paper printing, and for textile printing of yardage, printing techniques, cleaning and recuperation of the screens.

ACCF TDTT 290: Textile Technology
This course aims to provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of fibers and textiles (natural and man-made), their physical and chemical properties, main characteristics, production processes, and their use in the garment industry. It will develop students’ ability to recognize and categorize different fibers and textiles and assess their suitability for the construction of garments.

ACCF TDTB 281: Batik
This course aims to introduce students to the techniques of wax resist batik, paste resists, and the tied and shaped resist processes of Shibori. The projects gradually increase in complexity and are designed to introduce and instruct the students in how to control the image-making process, by solving various color and design problems through the manipulation of the resists and dyes bath sequences.

Interior & Product Design

ACCF IDGD 190: Geometric Design
The main objective of the course is to provide the students with the knowledge of the fundamentals of descriptive geometry as an instrument to represent real spaces and project spaces represented in a technical drawing. Exercises will consist of hand-drawn technical drawings such as orthogonal and volumetric projections. Starting with the drawing of geometric shapes, students will learn to draw pieces of furniture designed by great designers of the past, as well as domestic interiors and shops.

ACCF IDGD 290: Geometric Design II
This course is the continuation of Geometrical Drawing I. During class time students will analyze different drawing techniques such as those used in perspective drawing and outlines with shadowing, which were not fully covered in Geometrical Drawing I. The subject is organized in lectures and practical lessons. During technical drawing exercises, graphic techniques are applied to furniture, furnishings, furnished rooms, details of interior spaces, external space, etc.

ACCF IDBD 190: Basic Design
This course is organized into six core areas which are intended to develop the student’s creativity and provide the technical tools with which to translate this creativity into correctly drawn technical imagery. During the first part of the course, students will be asked to identify complex shapes composed of geometric and organic shapes and establish their interrelationships. During the second part of the course, students will complete simple exercises that demonstrate spatial concepts in their technical context. Students will design common domestic objects and conduct research and a critical analysis of similar objects on the market. The final project will consist of the graphical and technical presentation of an object from different spatial viewpoints: a plan view, a frontal view, a side view, and an axonometric view.

ACCF IDAS 190: Analysis of Styles
This course aims to give students a basic and general knowledge in the history of art and architecture. This course is useful for identifying and understanding the most famous Italian and international art and architectural styles, with particular attention to the most important European movements over the centuries. Students will study the «classical» styles: from the Greek and Roman Romanesque style, from the Gothic and Renaissance period up to the most significant styles of the 17th and 18th centuries.

ACCF IDDS 121: Architectural Design and Survey
The primary aim of the course is to stimulate the students to observe the reality of an object by freehand drawing and copying objects from prints and photographs. This course provides a basic knowledge of survey and technical drawing of objects and interior spaces. Students will examine the theory of survey and technical drawing, the instruments used and the various measuring strategies that are useful to the graphic rendering of the drawing.

ACCF IDID 290: Industrial Design I
The course aims to prepare students to design domestic household items using a rigorous project methodology that will enable them to experiment with the different materials currently used in design industries. By experimenting with different materials for each project, students will develop their own individual project design styles. In the first phase of the project, students will approach the various themes using drawing as a means of cognitive and design investigation. In the second phase, students will select and use techniques and instruments (drawing tools, computers, etc.) more in line with their own individual styles and preferences.

ACCF IDID 390: Industrial Design II
This course continues and elaborates on the themes introduced in Industrial Design I. Students will further develop their knowledge and skills in industrial design focusing on household items. The class will address the correct use of materials and the construction systems that dictate the object’s final shape. Students will refine their technical and geometric drawing skills as they are applied to their designs.

ACCF IDID 490: Industrial Design III
In this course, focused on composition and design, students will apply different design themes to resolve the various problems inherent in an industrial design project. The course will underline the relationship between the designer’s work and the productive process. Every company has its own identity, based on the use of specific material technology, its market zone, the customer target, its history and market philosophy, and so on. The students must develop their designs within this context while exercising their own personal style.

ACCF IDID 590: Advanced Industrial Design I
Students will investigate new needs and uses for products related to contemporary living through a careful analysis of the product and the market. They will then design industrial objects with an eye toward innovative form and function to improve the professional performance of a company of their choice.

ACCF IDID 690: Advanced Industrial Design II
This course deals with industrial design and how to face a design project in a practical and realistic manner. Special attention is given to the design process, a method to follow in order to organize and execute a design project from the beginning to the end. The projects developed are divided into 4 phases: Organization & Introduction, Research & Analysis, Ideation & Development, and Refinement & Presentation. The student will follow the four-phase process to produce at least 2 “complete” and several “mini” industrial design projects regarding two categories: Furniture and Product Design.

ACCF IDIP 290: Interior Planning I
This course will provide students with the necessary tools for a correct interpretation of the distribution and building analysis of living spaces. Students will learn the basics of spatial measurement and different illustration techniques for sketching interior spaces. Color, light, and style will be considered in the analysis of different rooms of a home. Students’ projects will focus on solving design problems for clients.

ACCF IDIP 390: Interior Planning II
The course will expand upon and further students’ skills and abilities related to the design of commercial spaces. Students will first analyze and research their chosen subject and develop preparatory sketches. Students will learn to design spaces in relation to use and to real distances. The lessons will help students to develop the critical and drawing skills needed to develop their projects, which will be presented at the end of the course.

ACCF IDIP 490: Interior Planning III
The aim of the course is to teach students project methodology to design domestic spaces (the house as a self-portrait) that will allow them to manage the project in its different stages and demonstrate its construction feasibility. They will examine the issues and problems related to the analysis of the space and its potentialities highlighted by the survey (spatial area, height, volume, floors, support frames, light sources, etc.). In the second part of the course, designing problems and issues will be discussed to enable the student to identify and describe his/her own project that will be fully elaborated on the computer. In addition, students will compile personal catalogs of furnishings (commercially available) to use as a reference guide for designing the project.

ACCF IDIP 590: Interior Planning IV
This course will extend and complete students’ training in designing public spaces with a project to design the interior of a fashion atelier. Students will conduct analysis and research, producing preparatory sketches related to public spaces. Lessons will provide instruction on how to reduce space in relation to use and to real distances, preparing them for a design for the chosen subject.

ACCF IDIP 690: Interior Planning V
In this course, students will complete a project related to public spaces. The course will focus on a single subject, in which students will study the use of a public space for a literary café or a daycare center. Students will conduct analysis and research on the project subject, producing preparatory sketches related to public spaces. Lessons will provide instruction on how to reduce space in relation to the use and to real distances, preparing them for a critical-graphic design for the chosen subject.

ACCF IDBM 390: Technology of Building Materials
This course will prepare students to develop simple solutions regarding the combination of different materials in the interior or exterior spaces, taking into consideration the different zones and uses of the living spaces. In addition to classroom lectures, the course will include guided visits to the main stores, showrooms, and local industries, in order to provide students with ample direct knowledge of the materials generally used in interior and exterior design. During the course, students will use free-hand drawing to represent materials and will conduct research about their use and application.

ACCF IDBM 490: Technology of Building Materials II
This course aims to familiarize students with the different characteristics of building materials so that they can understand how materials relate to interior design in all facets, and when and how the materials should be used in various environments. The class will include visits to showrooms and stores and technical exercises.

ACCF IDHD 290: History of Design
The course will investigate the issues related to Industrial Design as a language and means of mass communication. The course will discuss the evolution of the design language that has characterized the end of the last century and the first years of the new century, the role of the information revolution of digital design as it applies to Industrial Design, and the ongoing debate of the conflict between culture and technology. It will also discuss the new scenario in which the designer must address the development and management of new types of objects with new purposes, using software that is more flexible, powerful, and above all, designed as an extension of the brain’s impulses.

ACCF IDHD 390: History of Design II
This course will discuss the historical developments in the evolution of design forms over time, especially those of interest after the Second World War up to the present. It will focus on the major European and American designers and their iconic designs.

ACCF IDMD 390: Model Building
This is a basic level course that will begin with modeling soft materials, cutting them with manual instruments, to begin with, and then with electric machines. Each model will be developed employing a precise procedure: materials research, prototype models, and construction of the final models. In addition, the student will have to document each phase in the development of the project using drawings, photographs, collages, etc., up to the completion of the project.

ACCF IDMD 490: Model Building II
In this advanced-level course, students must already be familiar with the materials, cutting techniques, and use of machines. In addition to refining students’ model-building skills, this course aims to develop students’ skills in reading drawings, which are necessary to reproduce scale models of products, interiors, and architectural sites.

ACCF IDDM 471: Marketing
This course, starting from the various possible definitions of “marketing”, will investigate the function and objectives of marketing-mix strategies and the role and content of Market Planning. It will include an overview of the various stages of product development within the industry, from the development of the first concepts to monitoring of the first series produced and put on the market. The early stages of product development will be analyzed by investigating marketing, design, and production skills. The course will also analyze the Third Industrial Revolution and the role of the designer and marketer in this context. Students will analyze the elements of complexity and innovation in terms of design and ethics and the role of the designer in the entire production process.

ACCF IDCC 290: Introduction to AutoCAD
This course aims to provide the basic skills and knowledge required for computer animated design (CAD) and two-dimensional drawing. It will underline the relationships between traditional and automatic drawing so that students can gradually develop the mindset to understand and use the new system. At the end of the course, the student will be able to design and represent spatial plans and sections.

ACCF IDCC 380: CAD Cinema 4D
This first CAD course focuses on the basics of Cinema 4D software, starting with standard solid modeling and instruction on how to transform 2D geometric shapes into 3D objects. In this first semester, the students will learn how to import Autocad drawings as a starting point for 3D modeling.

ACCF IDCC 480: CAD Cinema 4D II
The main aim of this course is to instruct students in Vray basics; besides this software, this course will introduce some Autocad and Photoshop basics in order to provide tools to edit a simple 3D model.

ACCF IDCR 390: CAD Rhino I
This course will enable students to use Rhinoceros software to create simple, realistic industrial object models in less than ten minutes. Students will learn about 3-D modeling using Rhinoceros and NURBS modeling software. They will be introduced to a variety of 3-D application models used in industrial and interior design and will be engaged in multiple projects, learning how to model in Rhino through exercises that will address various issues beginning with simple ones and gradually becoming more complex.

ACCF IDCR 490: CAD Rhino II
This continuation of the introductory Rhinoceros course will expand upon what has already been learned. Students will learn new useful tools to create increasingly complex models within the appropriate replica and research strategies, using a few simple construction curves to create them. They will effectively and persuasively present their creations through the rendering engine V-Ray ASGvis.

ACCF IDWD 290: Design of Window Displays
The aim of this course is to provide students with the tools necessary to design window displays. Students will study the relationships between site, system and object (both physical and conceptual) as they research new approaches to contemporary museum display systems. During the course, they will design an exhibition for a collection of works or objects of various kinds in a specific space that will be assigned. The design phase will include a careful analysis of objects that will be displayed and spaces to set up, considering all the services related to the exhibition.

ACCF IDES 490: Design of External Spaces
This course aims to provide students with the instruments to analyze exterior spaces, to design projects that enrich the quality of life outdoors, and to improve their design capability. Students will deal with the problems related to constructed exterior spaces (such as city squares) and green spaces (such as gardens), with special attention given to the street furniture project. The course will analyze exterior urban spaces and how we perceive them – not only visually, but also through senses of sound, touch, and smell. The third part of the course will focus on the street furniture project, examining the definite restraints and researching the most appropriate aesthetical, functional and technological solutions.

ACCF IDES 590: Design of External Spaces II
This course will continue with the research started in Design of External Spaces I. Special attention will be given to the architectural elements of exterior design, such as how the space is cut, the desired functions of the design, and how people circulate. Design elements will include pavement, the introduction of green space, and water (such as fountains, basins, etc.). The relationship between the design and problematic elements such as traffic, environmental concerns, etc. will also be considered. Objects designed in the previous semester will be included in the final project’s design.

ACCF IDFS 190: Free-hand Sketching
The objective of the course is to develop and practice a series of techniques enabling the students to rapidly communicate their ideas with just pen and paper. Each class will introduce a new technique through a demonstration that will then be the subject of the following week’s assignment. Students will be encouraged to develop their own style using the fundamental techniques presented in the class. The classes will consist of the student’s presentation of sketches to the class for review, lectures and demonstrations, workshops (time in class working on techniques with the teacher one), and subsequent assignments.

ACCF IDMP 590: Materials and Industrial Processes 
The course will examine the industrial production processes of designing objects, using metals, plastics, and wood. The student will analyze the products, in particular, those created using innovative materials, and industrial design processes from their conception to the finished product.

Graphic Design

ACCF GDCT 190: Color Techniques
The objective of this course is to provide the student with a basic knowledge of applied color techniques for graphic illustration. Through the realistic use of colors and shapes, students will improve and perfect their illustration skills. Students will experience how colors, through their chromatic effects, forms, and expression, transmit different feelings and results. The students will study the different effects of light and shadow by putting into practice the various techniques

ACCF GDLT 290: Lettering
This course will introduce students to the most common calligraphic techniques and to the general rules of letter drawing necessary for a personal design style. Students will work on exercises as well as freehand geometrical designs and will develop their projects with various techniques, including freehand drawing. Their projects will be compiled in individual portfolios, which will be used to evaluate their progress throughout the course.

ACCF GDGD 190: Geometric Drawing
This course aims to provide students with the fundamentals of descriptive geometry through a combination of lectures and in-class exercises. Exercises will consist of hand-drawn technical drawings such as orthogonal and volumetric projections and perspective. Students will learn to draw letters, numbers, and logotypes based on geometric shapes.

ACCF GDII 141: Design of the Illustrated Image
The aims of this course are to teach the students how to design, develop and execute original illustrations, express their design ideas and how to accompany the text with illustrations. Students will explore the construction of illustrations using various techniques and media, including pencils, inks, watercolor, tempera, and acrylic paints.

ACCF GDCD 290: Computer Aided Graphic Design I
This course will provide students with a basic user knowledge of the main graphic software: Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator, with a review of other software. This computer-based component of the Basic Design course will introduce the students to graphic design and its principles, focusing mainly on technical aspects and the use of new technologies and computer software. The course will also introduce basic graphic design theory, history, concepts, and the main applications.

ACCF GDCD 390: Computer Aided Graphic Design II
During this course, students will study the various instruments of Illustrator, in particular those used to draw vectors. They will learn to draw a basic layout with InDesign through various exercises, learn to create a map and mask, learn to determine which programs to use for different types of projects, prepare and create a printed calendar using InDesign and tables for the layout, study the InDesign and Illustrator functions used to handle text and images and convert a graphic design project in PDF analyzing the various settings for printing and web.

ACCF GDPD 290: Elements of Publishing Design
The course aims to illustrate the elements behind the editorial graphics, trying to explain their birth and evolution over time with the advancement of editorial production techniques. Through the study of the signs, the alphabets, the paper, the printing methods, the composition structures, the layout and layout of publishing products, we will try to make familiar the processes of creating and producing graphics for publishing.

ACCF GDPD 390: Publishing Design
The goal of this course is to develop students’ understanding of the technical knowledge required to work as a designer in the publishing and graphic industry. Course topics will include the graphics industry’s print processes, rules, main features, quality levels, fields of application; mobile characters printing and creation of forms; the offset print method; colors: additive and subtractive synthesis, process table, Pantone solid colors; scanner; folding and set up; sizes and imposition.

ACCF GDGD 290: Introduction to Graphic Design
The course is designed to teach students the basics of graphic design in order to communicate ideas. The course will start from the study of the basic instruments necessary for a graphic design project, such as the analysis of a message, the study of the format, printing, colors, basic graphic composition, etc. in order to create and realize a basic graphic design project.

ACCF GDGD 390: Graphic Design II
In this continuation of Graphic Design I, there will be an increase in the complexity of projects and the quality of research. Students will use innovative ways of communication to solve complex problems and will autonomously manage a complete graphic design. They will research alternative solutions to troubleshoot graphics problems. The major tools of graphic design will be studied, including composition, sizes, structures and grids, fonts and their characteristics, hierarchies of communication, the use of color, weight, balance, etc.

ACCF GDGD 490: Graphic Design III
Using basic principles of communication, information, and promotion of products and services, students will create effective graphic design projects that are consistent with the brand philosophy and objectives of the promotional message. Students will analyze the general characteristics of goods or services and different methods and strategies of communication. They will research, design, and implement projects that appropriately communicate the brand, product, or service. The diverse distribution channels for graphic design (print, direct mail, web, etc.) will also be studied.

ACCF GDIN 390: Advertising Design I
Students will learn the basic principles of communication, information, and promotion of products and services in order to realize a graphic design project that reflects the company brand philosophy and objectives. Students will analyze the general characteristics of goods or services as well as the different communication methods and strategies in order to propose effective brand communication projects through the various graphic design distribution channels (print, direct mail, web, etc.).

ACCF GDIN 490: Advertising Design II
In this continuation of Advertising Design I, students will conduct research on the client’s target in relation to the project subject, using the most effective and communicative type of graphic imagery and language. They will implement solutions through layout, produce comprehensive and refined sketches which predict the final solution, perform executive works using appropriate media and produce a complete project, documenting the entire process (with texts, photos, and illustrations).

ACCF GDAN 390: 3-D Animation
This course aims to develop student’s skills in creating basic 3-D animated objects using Cinema 4D software. During the course, students will become familiar with the software and tools used to create 3-D animated objects. They will learn to create a video using Sound Effector, photo-insert a 3-D object using camera mapping, and insert a 3-D object into a video landscape.

ACCF GDAN 490: 3-D Animation II
This course aims to further develop student’s skills in the use of 3-D animation so that it can be used for the creation of a professional portfolio. Students will use Cinema 4D software to create a video advertising and digital art campaign on the theme of food. They will also create a professional portfolio in a video format.

Photography & New Media

ACCF PTHP 190: History of Photography
The objectives of the course are to provide students with the necessary background in order to understand the important social and artistic role that photography has played in the history of communications and to build the student’s observational skills so that they will look at photographs in an active, critical way, understanding the photographer’s ideas and the historical/ cultural/social context of the image. The program aims at illustrating the different ideas of photography developed over time, identifying trends and prevailing practices. Particular attention is paid to the transformations that the idea of photography has undergone in recent times, from digital pictures to contemporary art.

ACCF PTTT 190: Traditional Photographic Techniques
The objective of this course is to complete the student’s introduction to analogic (and even non-analogic) photography basics: composition, exposure, black and white film development, and printing. The result of this photographic research shouldn’t be a “collection of single shots”, but rather a coherent body of work, developing a clearly defined subject, through an adequate visual strategy. Each student will have to explain his/her research, the visual suggestions and the narrative strategies adopted, the possible extra equipment employed, and the work schedule. Students will take photographs outside of class time and will develop and print them at school. Students will learn and practice procedures of black and white film development and printing.

ACCF PTTT 290: Photographic Techniques and Technology
This course offers an in-depth analysis of digital photographic images, with a technical and critical approach to postproduction. It begins with an analysis of the IT characteristics of digital images and continues with the study of photo management and editing software. Subjects will include digital color, file typologies and characteristics, Adobe Bridge® browser, and backup systems. Raw file development will be studied in depth using the Camera Raw® interface and Adobe Lightroom® software will be used as an on/offline manager, a development software, and as an output tool. The second half of the course will focus on a detailed and applied study of Adobe Photoshop® software, including interfaces, menus, instruments, selections, channels, layers, layer masks and filters.

ACCF PTDI 290: Digital Image Elaboration
The course includes an in-depth analysis of digital photographic images together with a technical and critical approach to postproduction. It begins with an analysis of the IT characteristics of digital images and continues with the study of photo management and elaboration/processing software. Topics will include digital color, file typologies and characteristics, Adobe Bridge browser, and backup systems. We will study raw file development in depth, using Camera Raw interface and Adobe Lightroom software as an on/offline manager, as a development software, and as an output tool. The second half of the course will focus on a detailed and applied study of Adobe Photoshop® software including interfaces, menus, instruments, selections, channels, layers, layer masks, and filters.

ACCF PTLP 390: Landscape Photography
This course aims to introduce students to the technical knowledge of large format photography along with the typical language of landscape photography, which will be learned through the study of the main features of architecture and of historic Italian landscape painting, as well as examples of landscape photography throughout history.

ACCF FDFP 490 Fashion Photography
This course aims to provide students with the cultural and technical tools needed to design and direct the production of photographic images for the world of fashion, whether as art directors of their own collections or as stylists for fashion shoots and advertising campaigns During the course, various topics related to the language of photography will be discussed, in addition to the principles of art direction and the research of trends for the proper construction of photographic fashion images.

ACCF PTPJ 490: Photojournalism
This course will discuss criteria that define news or general interest stories, as well as the guidelines for a correct narration. The various languages of photojournalism will be analyzed, such as news, reportage, and story-telling. Topics will include the markets of photojournalism, the relationship with agencies, freelancers, work, and the making of an assignment. The second half of the course will be dedicated to shooting techniques in photojournalism, file handling, and postproduction. It will discuss the organization of work, including professional ethics as well as the rights and duties of photojournalists.

ACCF PTVW 490: Video Works
During this course, students will be exposed to all aspects of the production cycle from pre-planning to post-production. They will learn to create a video project starting from a storyboard. The second part of the course is structured on two levels. On the one hand, the theoretical lessons foresee a detailed study of editing. On the other hand, practical exercises will consolidate and increase the student’s knowledge. The course will introduce students to specific editing software, through practical exercises, and with the typical language used to create a story through images.

ACCF PTVW 590: Video Works II
This course aims to impart technical knowledge of specific editing software (Adobe Premiere) through practical exercises and with the typical language used to create a story through images. Lectures will involve a detailed study of editing, and practice exercises will consolidate and increase students’ knowledge of video works.

ACCF PTPP 490: Photography Portfolio
The purpose of the course is to introduce the student to the world of work: helping them to select an area of specialization and gain an understanding of its requirements, guiding the student in creating and producing a professional portfolio suitable for the specific chosen field of work. The course aims to be an open space for meeting and discussion, a reference point for the autonomous development of high-profile photographic projects/projects that students will develop during the fifth and sixth semesters as final projects. The course orbits around 4 meetings each semester, with photographers, curators, and photo editors who will be invited to present the singularity of their own area of work.

Liberal Arts

ACCF FDTC390: History of 20th Century Fashion
This course aims to provide an overview of the historical development of fashion in the 20th century. This course examines both high and popular fashion, primarily in Europe, placing fashion products and concepts in the context of society, culture, and economics. In this introductory course the emphasis is on these interconnections, but some elementary notions of fashion theory, especially in regard to gender and to marketing, are addressed.

ACCF HSTS 330: History of Tuscany
This course aims to provide students with an overview of the evolution of Florentine political, cultural, and social history from the rise of the Medici to the Grand Duchy of Tuscany. Many of the events of this period still condition our lives today – one has just to remember our perceived importance of Renaissance ideas, the Medici, Machiavelli, Leonardo da Vinci, and Michelangelo Buonarroti.

ACCF ITLN 101: Elementary Italian I
This course begins with the most elementary communicative needs for salutations and personal identification. Students learn to form questions and answers about information relative to the world in which they find themselves. This work is backed up by an in-depth study of grammar to provide the student with a morpho-syntactical basis. Exercises will include games, situational studies, and instruments through which the student has the possibility to use the grammatical structures and the vocabulary acquired up to that point. Coursework corresponds to European Framework level A-1.

ACCF ITLN 102: Elementary Italian II
This course is a continuation of ITLN 101, with emphasis on conversation and the use of elementary and intermediate grammar covered during the lessons. Audio-visuals are used such as films and video clips to simulate typical situations and to stimulate conversation. Coursework corresponds to European Framework level A-2.

ACCF ITLN 201: Intermediate Italian I
The intermediate course in Italian language, grammar, vocabulary, and conversation is supported by video presentations of topical situations for conversation and increasing comprehension. Exercises will include reading newspapers, games, texts, situational studies, and instruments through which the student has the possibility to use the grammatical structures and the vocabulary acquired up to that point. Coursework corresponds to European Framework level B-1.

ACCF ITLN 202: Intermediate Italian II
The intermediate course in Italian language, grammar, vocabulary, and conversation is supported by video presentations of topical situations for conversation and increasing comprehension. Exercises will include reading newspapers, games, texts, situational studies, and instruments through which the student has the possibility to use the grammatical structures and the vocabulary acquired up to that point. Coursework corresponds to European Framework level B-2.

ACCF ITLN 301: Advanced Italian
Advanced course in the Italian language. Advanced composition skills and conversation supported by video presentations of topical situations for conversation and increasing comprehension. Coursework corresponds to European Framework level C-1.

ACCF AHMM 210: Italian Renaissance Art
This course offers an introduction to the painting, sculpture, and architecture of the 15th and 16th centuries. Special attention is given to Florence and its monuments and to key figures including Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo, and Michelangelo. The primary focus will be on stylistic and typological developments. Artwork will be considered within the contexts of patronage, biography, and the broader cultural and social life of the period.

ACCF AHMI 310: Life and Works of Michelangelo
This course examines the life and works in painting, sculpture, and architecture of Michelangelo Buonarroti. In the course of examining his individual works, we will consider how the political and cultural context influenced his artistic production and his response to these factors as well as the particularities of each commission. We will discuss the relationship of his work to that of his contemporaries and successors, both in terms of style and the myth of the artist.

ACCF LIIT 320: Italian Literature in the 20th Century
This course aims to introduce students to modern Italian literature. The course will focus mainly on the development of the Italian narrative from the end of the 19th to the end of the 20th century. The authors studied will include classics such as Svevo, Pirandello, Calvino, Gadda, and Morante as well as contemporary authors such as Ammanniti and Camilleri. The course and readings will be in English.

ACCF LIIT 321: Italian Literature 1200 – 1500
This course provides an introduction to Italian Medieval and Renaissance literature. The first part of the course will be dedicated to Dante Alighieri (the Divine Comedy) and will continue with short stories (la novella) written by some of the most important prose writers in history, including Giovanni Boccaccio (Decameron), Lorenzo il Magnifico and Niccolo’ Machiavelli. It will explore the relationship between literature and the new mercantile class ( i Mercanti).

ACCF MSIC 310: Italian Cinema
This course aims to provide an overview of Italian Cinema, from the silent era to the present, assessing its impact on Italian culture and society. This course will include analytical screenings of the films of the masters: Rossellini, De Sica, and Fellini. Particular emphasis is on Italian Neorealism and its worldwide influence. Successful film genres, such as comedyspaghetti western, and poliziesco are also introduced.

ACCF POIT 350: Italy in the European Union
This course is organized on the historical development of national and international interests in both Italy and Europe as a whole between WWII and the present. With Italy as a founding EU member committed to the project of peaceful unity, the narratives intertwine. Various issues – cultural, social, political, and economic – are addressed. Topics include the EU and major problems in contemporary Italy; the preservation of Italian national interests; the EU from a global and American perspective.

ACCF SOIT 360: Italian Style
The course examines basic aspects of Italian culture, leading the students towards an understanding of the most common perceptions of Italy and Italians, comparing their respective images, as projected throughout the world and perceived from outside. Students will be encouraged to make connections and ask questions and, by the end of the course, are expected to have accumulated a series of elements that allow them to consider the Italian identity from an informed point of view.

ACCF SALD 110: Life Drawing I
This is an intensive drawing course in which students draw daily and do weekly exercises and assignments in order to learn and improve their skills in realistic drawing. In this course, each student will complete more than 100 drawings. The course is suitable for all skill levels, from beginning students to professional artists who wish to focus on how to draw and render from life. Students will work in the studio and at home on subjects that include still-life, portraits, and the nude model.

ACCF SAPT 110: Painting Techniques I
This is an introductory level course in which students work individually and in groups, in the studio and at home. Students work in watercolor, oil, acrylic, large-scale scenic painting, and mixed media. Each technique is demonstrated by the professor who is a working artist. Students follow structured assignments in and out of class. Although there is a strong emphasis on materials and their uses, the formal aspects of painting are also covered in discussions on composition, color, perspective, and fundamentals of two-dimensional design.

ACCF SAPT 310: Painting Techniques II
This class is a continuation of SAPT 110 Painting Techniques I. This course aims to help each student develop a project from concept to finished work with all the preparation, work, and revision that requires. Students will learn the practical, professional, and organizational aspects of being an artist while at the same time developing their own artistic vision. At the end of the course, students understand their own working processes better.

ACCF SASF 110: Sketching Florence
In this course, students will learn the basics of sketching from real life with the most beautiful and important sites of historical Florence as subject matter. The classes will begin indoors, in museums such as the Bargello or the Accademia, where students will stand face to face with the masterpieces that have characterized Florentine sculpture, and in some of the most impressive churches (S. Maria Novella, Santa Croce, etc.) and will then work their way outdoors, where, weather permitting, the focus will be on the study of the surrounding architecture and environment. The itinerary will include the church of Santo Spirito, the Loggia dei Lanzi, the San Miniato cemetery, Fort Belvedere, and so on.

ACCF SAMM 310: Mixed Media
This is a studio art course designed for beginning and intermediate students, although more advanced students will be given the opportunity for individual guidance. The course is structured on five projects. Each one will involve the use of different techniques and materials. The projects are: plaster cast, clay modeling, 3D collage, lino cut, and micro installation.

ACCF SAPF 310: Photographing Florence
This course is an introduction to photography. Through the construction and the use of the pinhole cameras, we will approach the technical basis of photography. We will create at least three/four urban landscape images, and then we will go “digitally”, exercising on the theme of “street photography”. We will gain an understanding as to which are the variables that determine the rendering and the specificity of the photographic images, as well as the technical basis specific of digital photography (how to set the camera, the numbers, the format, and rudiments of the post-production software). The course takes advantage of the opportunity of being in Florence to introduce the ideas of a photo project: sequences of photos, documenting a place, telling stories and atmosphere.

APPRENTICESHIP

Apprenticeships are organized by Schola Academy Firenze in collaboration with exclusive brands such as Stefano Bemer, Scuola del Cuoio, Superduper, and Cibrèo. Apprenticeships are hands-on experiences that are supervised by Master Artisans from the partner brands. Fashion apprenticeships integrate design, technical skills (pattern-making, construction, etc.), branding, and marketing.  Culinary apprenticeships integrate the knowledge of ingredients, cooking skills, and restaurant management. The aim is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to realize their ideas and creativity into an actual finalized product.

Students enroll in one 6-credit apprenticeship plus up to 3 courses (9 credits). Note that apprenticeships are an additional fee of $1500, which will be added to the program fee.  Click on the title to download the syllabus.

Leather Experience in Bagmaking


This apprenticeship carries on the great tradition and incomparable, unrivaled knowledge of Scuola del Cuoio, merging tradition and contemporaneity. Students will learn all the major leather bag-making techniques, alongside design, branding, and management elements that are crucial to developing a personal path in the fashion industry.

The apprenticeship features professional training in pattern making and prototyping of basic constructions, such as:

  • Clutch bags
  • Bucket bags
  • Classic bags with compartments
  • Saddle Bags

The final project of each student is the common thread of the apprenticeship, leading students to acquire the skills and the knowledge to put their ideas into practice. Students will be encouraged to think and develop the essential elements of their own design identity. Students will conceive, design, and create their own capsule collection, starting to define their personal aesthetic vision while thinking about brand-building strategies.

The skills and vision acquired during the apprenticeship give students the opportunity to start or enrich a professional career as:

  • Pattern Makers
  • Prototypers
  • Product Developers
  • Accessory Designers
  • Fashion Entrepreneurs

The Scuola del Cuoio was founded in 1949 through the collaborative efforts of the Franciscan Friars of the Monastery of Santa Croce and the Gori and Casini families, Florentine leather artisans since the 1930s. Scuola del Cuoio is the leading workshop in Italy for bag making and leather working.

Bespoke Shoemaking (Stefano Bremer)

Students will learn skills of luxury shoemaking, design their own collection and obtain a professional skill level. The final project of each student will be the common thread of the course and will lead the students to acquire the skills and the knowledge to put their ideas into practice.  Students will be encouraged to think and develop the essential elements of their own design identity. Students will conceive, design, and create their own capsule collection, starting to define their personal aesthetic vision while commencing to think about possible brand-building strategies.

The skills and vision acquired during the apprenticeship give students the opportunity to start or enrich a professional career as:

  • Bespoke Shoemakers
  • Shoe Designers
  • Shoe Prototypers
  • Technical Consultants
  • Fashion Entrepreneurs

Stefano Bemer committed his career to master his unique blend of shoemaking techniques to become the perfect Italian men’s shoe. This quest to develop his own idea of perfection has led to accomplishments that have been recognized and acclaimed by connoisseurs all around the world. This would have been enough for most people. However, great people in history understand that it is not just about themselves, in the here and now, but also about their legacy and the impact they have on others. With this in mind, Stefano Bemer is committed to training artisans and transmitting its own legacy of quality and style.

Womens Shoemaking (Stefano Bemer)

This apprenticeship focuses on designing and prototyping women’s shoes by blending the traditional with the contemporary.  Students will learn classic artisanal manufacturing techniques, design, and branding strategies, to become a modern craftsperson able to join the fashion industry or develop a personal business.

The final project of each student will be the common thread of the course and will lead students to acquire the skills and the knowledge to put their ideas into practice.  Students will be encouraged to think and develop the essential elements of their own design identity. Students will conceive, design, and create their own capsule collection, starting to define their personal aesthetic vision while commencing to think about possible brand-building strategies.

The skills and vision acquired during the course give students the opportunity to start or enrich a professional career in the fields of women’s footwear as:

  • Pattern Makers
  • Prototypers
  • Product Developers
  • Technical Consultants
  • Master Cobblers
  • Fashion Entrepreneurs

Stefano Bemer committed his career to master his unique blend of shoemaking techniques to become the perfect Italian men’s shoe. This quest to develop his own idea of perfection has led to accomplishments that have been recognized and acclaimed by connoisseurs all around the world. This would have been enough for most people. However, great people in history understand that it is not just about themselves, in the here and now, but also about their legacy and the impact they have on others. With this in mind, Stefano Bemer is committed to training artisans and transmitting its own legacy of quality and style.

Handmade Hats (Superduper)

This apprenticeship will take students into the world of fashion ateliers. Students will acquire master craft skills while learning how to launch their own brand through on-field lectures about branding and design. The apprenticeship consists of two modules. The first features an intensive introduction to Hat Making, with notions on design and branding too. In the second module, students decide their favorite path to attend, choosing between Design, Branding, and Making. Each path has its own artisan from SUPERDUPER, in order to provide the best training and learning method.

The apprenticeship delivers the widest and deepest training in Hat making and Design, featuring:

  • Blocked Hats: Making and Design
  • Blocking Hats by hands and machine
  • Hand stitching and use of a plain sewing machine
  • Use of: Hand and Machine brim cutter, Arm sewing machine, Chain sewing machine
  • Design and Branding labs
  • Final Project

The final project will be the common thread of the course and will lead students to acquire the skills and the knowledge to put ideas into practice. Students will be encouraged to think and develop the essential elements of their design identity. Students will conceive, design, and create their own capsule collection, starting to define their personal aesthetic vision while commencing to think about possible brand-building strategies.

The skills and vision acquired during the apprenticeship give students the opportunity to start or enrich a professional career as:

  • Hatmakers
  • Product Developers
  • Accessory Designers
  • Technical Consultants
  • Fashion Entrepreneurs

Superduper, founded in Florence in 2011, grew out of a period of creative experimentation and a strong desire to make. This opened us up to a new territory waiting to be rediscovered – the world of hats. Within two years, the company was gaining industry recognition for its fresh take on an artisanal heritage. In 2013, the brand won the Who is on Next? Award in the Men’s category, with a special mention in the Women’s category. Today, Superduper has matured into a global brand that can be found around the world.

From their creative studio and workshop at Manifattura Tabacchi, Superduper challenges the standard operating model of fashion e-commerce. The signature method allows them to make all online purchases to order, reducing waste and excess inventory while maintaining the highest quality. Internal production means that they can make a hat in 72 hours, transforming the finest raw materials into the hands of a team of young artisans.

Food Artisan

Students will train at one or more Cibreo venues, considered one of the most renowned culinary businesses in Florence and Italy, allowing students to learn the entire process of a professional kitchen by working in direct contact with its staff. Students will have a 360° technical, practical, and theoretical approach to everything that concerns food production, preparation, consumption, and business.

The apprenticeship is designed with a focus on the knowledge of local, seasonal, and artisanal ingredients, cooking skills, and restaurant management. Students will learn how to develop a new concept for culinary projects and artisan food businesses and fundamental cooking techniques and how to source and select the best quality ingredients. The apprenticeship features professional training on:

  • Homemade Pasta, gnocchi, Italian classics
  • Fish and seafood
  • Baking: bread, pizza
  • Introduction to pastry

Students will be required to complete and present their Final Project – including a business plan, logo, and a defined brand strategy. The final project will be an original concept for a new format in the culinary business, anywhere in the world.

Cibrèo was founded on September 8th, 1979 following an intuition by Fabio Picchi, who chose this name in full harmony with its family tradition and with a real passion for the alchemy of Florentine cuisine. In a constant shift between past and present, the city, the neighborhood, and the whole world,  Cibrèo has become the ideal setting for cultural discussion and social promotion. Cibrèo is not only a restaurant it is also an eatery – Cibrèo Trattoria (the so-called Cibrèino), a coffee shop – Caffè Cibrèo, a cultural association – Teatro del Sale,  a Tuscan Oriental restaurant – Ciblèo and a grocery store, C.Bio.

Ceremic Crafts (Niccolo Poggi Firenze)

This apprenticeship blends classic elements of pottery with digital design. Students will learn the skills of ceramic making, including fundamental pottery and glazing techniques combined with 3D Design (Rhinoceros suite). Specifically, students will gain knowledge and skills in:

  • Basic 3D Design shapes
  • Wheel-thrown, hand-built pottery
  • Glazing, embossing, decoration
  • Basic firing notions

The final project of each student will be the common thread of the course and will lead the students to acquire the skills and the knowledge to put their ideas into practice.  Students will be encouraged to think and develop the essential elements of their own design identity. Students will conceive, design, and create their own capsule collection, starting to define their personal aesthetic vision while commencing to think about possible brand-building strategies.

The skills and vision acquired during the apprenticeship give students the opportunity to start or enrich a professional career in the fields of Ceramic Crafts and Design as:

  • Product Designers
  • Visual Artists
  • Entrepreneurs and contemporary Artisans

Niccolo’ Poggi is the grandson of Ugo Poggi, who founded the company Ugo Poggi in Florence in 1900 as a furniture factory.  In 1922, Ugo Poggi opened a shop on Florence’s premier shopping street, Via Strozzi, producing and selling pottery, silverware, china, Murano glass, crystal, and furnishings. Niccolo’ Poggi is now an award-winning designer based in Florence. After graduating with a degree in architecture from The University of Florence, Niccolò started work as an architect and interior designer. While working as an architect, Niccolò was commissioned to design products for international brands, which inspired him to create and produce his own designs.

INTERNSHIP @ ZEROLAB

The fashion sector represents the backbone of the Tuscan and Italian industry, counting almost 22,000 companies that employ over 120,000 employees and impacting over 28% of total exports. A fundamental part of the fashion sector is leather goods, where the high quality of products makes it possible to achieve an international reputation for the most important luxury brands. The economic scope of the sector has an equally strong impact on the environment and on the disposal chain: the leather goods sector creates an enormous quantity of waste, the main part of which are scraps of leather.

Zerolab’s mission is to reduce waste by exploiting artisan skills to transform waste into new products. Zerolab created the first hub for the creative recovery of leather scraps and serves as an incubator and training center for emerging designers, artisans, and craftspeople. The waste represents an opportunity to give new life not only to materials but to new ideas and projects.

Internships at Zerolab focus on one or multiple aspects of the company’s operation, including but not limited to:

  1. Develop promotional plans for circulating leather, both digitally and physically.
  2. Create social media campaigns to capture Zerolab’s mission, track engagement, and evaluate the effectiveness of marketing ideas in real time across social channels.
  3. Research and develop partnerships and promotional opportunities across digital channels to raise awareness of Zerolab’s mission.
  4. Research, outreach, and follow-up for the international press, collaborators, and business opportunities.
  5. Preparing rescued leather inventory for reuse and resale, learning Amazon and other online channels for reselling leather excess.
  6. Working within a team to get leather inventory online, and represented in a way that can drive interest.

Students must commit to a minimum of 120 hours, maintain a daily journal of activities and learning outcomes, and submit a term paper. Students will earn 3 credits for INT 499 Professional Internship.

Internship spaces are limited and will be filled on a rolling basis. KEi encourages students to complete their KEI enrollment process early. There is no additional fee for an internship.

CREDIT & TRANSCRIPTS

Credit and transcripts for courses and apprenticeships are awarded by Accademia Italiana (accredited in Italy) and Lincoln University (accredited in USA). Credit and transcripts for internships are awarded by Lincoln University.

HOST UNIVERSITY

Accademia Italiana, founded in 1984, is one of the top design schools in Italy. The Florence campus is located in the heart of the historic district and has state-of-the-art facilities. Academia’s faculty consists of prominent designers, artists, and scholars who are working professionals in their chosen fields. Accademia is accredited by Italy’s Ministry of Education.